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Planting Trees and Shrubs

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Before You Plant

Always plant in a well drained soil. To test for soil drainage, dig a hole for your new plant and fill it with water. If the water doesn’t drain in 12 hours, the soil in that area will need to be amended dramatically.

What Plant Form are You Transplanting?

Your tree or shrub will come in two forms: Balled and burlapped (B&B); or containerized. Containerized or B&B plants can be planted any time the ground is not frozen. If possible plant your tree or shrub as soon as you get it home. Otherwise, it may dry out and become injured. If you can’t plant it immediately, place it in a shady and/or sheltered location. Keep the soil moist until planted.

The Planting Hole

To plant your tree or shrub dig a hole twice as wide as the diameter and 6”-8” deeper than the root ball, replacing the 6”-8” of soil with enriched backfill. Compact this 6”-8” of soil. Once the plant is placed in the hole, the top of the root ball should be slightly above or level with the surface of the ground. Placing Your Plant in the Hole Remove all tags, wires or ropes from the stems or trunk, and do the following: Balled & Burlapped Plants: DO NOT remove the wire basket. Once the enriched soil has been placed ¾ of the way up the

Placing Your Plant in the Hole

placing-plant

Remove all tags, wires or ropes from the stems or trunk, and do the following:

Balled & Burlapped Plants
DO NOT remove the wire basket. Once the enriched soil has been placed 3/4 of the way up the root ball, cut & fold down the top 1/4 of the basket & burlap, remove any strings around the tree trunk. Fill the remaining hole with enriched soil to its original level.

Container Plants
Ease the pot off without disturbing the root ball. If the roots are extremely compacted, you may need to make a few shallow cuts through the roots on the side and bottom of the root ball.

Enriching Your Soil & Backfilling

Mix the soil taken out of the hole with Bumper Crop then backfill around the root ball. Tamp the soil lightly every 2”-3”, and fill the hole with the enriched soil to its original level. Use excess soil to build a ring 6” –10” from the outside of the hole. This will help the water to move slowly down to the root zone of the plant as well as minimize the runoff.

Watering

Water your newly planted tree or shrub by using a slow, deep watering method. B&B and container plant roots dry out faster than the soil around them, so it is important to monitor their soil moisture. Water slowly to attain deep water penetration which encourages widespread root development. You will need to water once every 7-10 days (or more during hot dry periods). Apply Root Master B1 after every watering

hoseGeneral Watering guidelines:
1 gal. Pot – trickle water for approx. 15-20 minutes
2 gal. Pot – trickle water for approx 30-40 minutes
3 gal. Pot – trickle water for approx 40-50 minutes
4 gal. To 7 gal. – trickle water for approx 60 minutes
B&B – trickle water for 60-70 minutes
Remember, if it rains for 1 hr, it probably was not enough water for a newly planted shrub or tree.

waterWater your plants thoroughly, then remove them from their pots by inverting them and supporting the root ball. If the roots are compacted, you may need to make a few shallow cuts through the roots on the side and bottom of the root ball. Place your plant into the hole. Add the enriched soil to ground level. Water the plant thoroughly to ensure the soil fills in completely around the roots, eliminating air pockets. Apply Rootmaster B1 at this time. Reapply Rootmaster B1 at every watering for the first year. Monitor your plants daily. Water slowly to attain deep water penetration which encourages widespread root development. Feed perennials bi-weekly with Bud & Bloom fertilizer. Add a 2”- 3” mulch layer around the plant. This will prevent water loss and keep mowers & trimmers from getting too close to the plant. Avoid overly deep mulch against the stem or trunk of the plant, as this can promote disease or pest injury.

Staking

Unless necessary, trees should not be staked. If your tree or shrub is top heavy or in an exposed area, you may stake the plant to anchor the root ball so roots can develop rapidly into the new soil around the tree. Connect the stakes to the trunk with flexible lines and straps designed for this use. Allow for some movement in the plant for strong growth. Remove the stakes and lines after one growing season so you do not inhibit trunk development.

Mulching

mulchAdd a 2”-3” layer of shredded mulch or chips around the plant. This will prevent water loss and keep mowers and trimmers from getting too close to the plant. Avoid overly deep mulch against the trunk or stem of the plant as this can promote disease or pest injury.

Planting Perennial & Annual Plants

planting-perennials

Plant your plants around your planting area while still in their pots. Make sure you have taken into consideration the mature height of the plants as well as the sun or shade requirements. Determine an appropriate location for planting, then dig a hole2 times the width & 6”-8” deeper, replacing with enriched soil (compact this 6”-8” of soil) Add a generous amount of Bumper Crop to enrich the soil. Blend into the soil.

For Successful Planting

mn-prodsBumper Crop
An all-organic soil builder with high organic nutrient content and endo- and ecto-mycorrhizal fungi.

Master Start
A fertilizer for all new plantings of sod or seeded lawns, shrubs, ground covers, flowers, or bare root plantings. Provides the right nutrient mix to develop a sturdy root system and strong top growth.

Root Master B1
Formulated to reduce plant shock and improve resistance to stress. Improves water and nutrient uptake.

Fall Is A Great Time For Planting Trees & Shrubs

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Image result for fall is the perfect time to plant trees

There is a false perception in the gardening world that fall is the end of the growing season. In fact, it is quite the contrary. Fall is an ideal season for planting trees, shrubs and other assorted plants. The key is encouraging good root growth. Planting trees and shrubs in fall enables the root systems to grow before the hot summer returns.

Smaller plants will be established before winter sets in, and get a head start over shrubs in the spring. Larger plants will also get a head start since a general rule of thumb is one year per one inch of trunk diameter.

Fall officially begins with autumnal equinox in late September. The ideal time to begin planting trees and shrubs is six weeks before the first sign of hard frost. September through November is the ideal time for tree planting because it allows the roots to become established before the ground freezes and winter sets in. However, it is highly recommended that you do not continue planting trees too late into the fall because this can have a negative impact on plant health.

Cooler, wetter weather is the perfect time for tree planting. With an increase in rainfall and cooler temperatures in the fall, less watering is needed. As tree shoot growth halts, the trees require less water because the days are cooler and shorter and the rate of photosynthesis decreases. Stable air temperatures also promote rapid root development. Soils stay warm well after the air temperature cools, also encouraging root growth. During shoot dormancy, trees grow to establish roots in new locations before warm weather stimulates top growth.

There are several benefits to fall planting. Trees planted in the fall are better equipped to deal with heat and drought in the following season. Another great reason to plant your shrubs in the fall is because you can pick your trees and shrubs by the fall color they produce. Avoid planting broad leaved evergreens in the fall such as rhododendrons, azaleas, boxwoods and hollies. If planted, provide them with protection from winter winds and have them treated with an anti desiccant. Some tree species that are recommended for fall planting include the maple, buckeye, horse chestnut, alder, catalpa, hackberry, hawthorn, ash, honey locust, crabapple, amur corktree, spruce, pine, sycamore, linden and elm.

Article from saveatree.com

 

Summer is a Great Time to Plant!

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Summer Planting

Summer is a Great Time to Plant!

Most trees and plants grow the fastest during the hot summer months. You see this in your own yard year after year.

For best results, make sure that your plants are potted in their own soil and are well rooted in.   Avoid trees that arrive bare root (this is where the soil has been washed off the roots).

In the summer we only ship potted trees with vibrant root systems. This insures that your plants quickly get established and take off. So you get to take advantage of all the extra growth this summer season.

Watering

First things first, pay attention to your plant’s watering needs. Over watering is often the more common cause of harm to young plants than under watering. By looking at your plant’s leaves you can tell a lot about their watering needs. If the leaves are starting to turn light brown and curling upwards then your plant is dry, and it needs more water. However, slowly increase the amount of water you give it, don’t over correct under watering with over watering. If the leaves start to droop or wilt and look like they’re too heavy for the branches to hold up, or turn dark brown or black then your plant is getting too much water, give them a break!

It’s best to give your plants a slow deep watering every few days instead of a little water every day. A little water every day can cause your plants roots to stay close to the surface because they won’t have to grow downwards in search of water. By holding a hose to your plants base and counting to 20 or seconds the water will soak deeper into the soil and the roots will TreeRootsgo further down in order to draw moisture out of the soil. This will result in a more rooted plant with roots that are deeper in the ground soil, which often holds more moisture for plants to utilize.

Roots tend to spread out as much as the plant’s canopy does. A tree’s branches are a mirror image for the root system that we can’t see underground, keep that in mind while giving your trees water in order to properly water them around their bases.

Remember your plant’s individual watering needs. For example, Double Knockout Roses like it when their soil is kept moist, and Crape Myrtles like it when their soil dries out before they get more water. If you aren’t sure about how often to water your plants, feel the soil. If it feels close to drying out, or moist this will be a good indicator if your plants need more water or not. Just remember to never over saturate the soil.

GatorBagThe best time to give your plants water during the summer is in the early morning or evening towards dusk. This way the sun won’t evaporate the moisture during the hot, sunny afternoons. However, we understand that people are busy! If you don’t have time to check on your plant’s soil multiple times a week, consider getting a gator bag. Gator bags lay on the ground around a tree’s trunk and slowly release water into the soil over time. When the soil feels like it’s getting too dry, the gator bag releases more water. Gator bags usually need to be filled once or twice a week.

Mulch

iStock_000027341270_LargeAdding a 3 inch layer of mulch around the soil around the base of your plants can be extremely beneficial. They help the soil retain moisture, so you won’t need to water your plants as often. Mulch also helps to regulate the temperature of your plants so they won’t heat up too fast. When temperatures can jump from 93 degrees one hour to 97 degrees the next, this rapid heat gain can stress plants out because they warm up too fast. Mulch keeps plants cool, and allows them to slowly warm up.

Sun Burn

Just like us, trees can get sun burn from too much intense, direct sunlight. If you’re moving your potted tree from indoors to out, place it outside for an hour or two every day and slowly increase how much time it spends outside over the course of a few days. This way your tree will get used to the sunlight instead of suddenly getting a bad burn.

TreeGuardYou can tell if your trees are getting burned by looking at their bark. It will turn a light pale green color, or a pale grey color. To protect newly planted trees you can get shade screens and strategically place them to shade your trees from the harsh afternoon sun. Another option would be to get a loose fitting, white tree guard, which wraps around the trunks of trees and reflects harsh sunlight, and heat away. This is beneficial in both the summer and winter.

Tree wraps are an excellent alternative to painting some of the tree’s trunk white. Tree wraps are less permanent than paint, plus painting too much of the trunk white can cause trees to suffocate.

The Don’ts

iStock_000021161986_Large (1)Don’t fertilize your plant in the summer. It’s better to give them a slow release fertilizer early in the spring. Fertilizer can stress a plant out and burn the roots if there isn’t enough moisture to break it down.

Don’t prune your plants in the summer. Plants already spend a lot of time and energy battling summer heat, if they have to heal where their limbs were cut then it adds to the stress even more.

Don’t forget about bugs and diseases. Dry trees are more susceptible to pests, molds, diseases and more. Look at the leaves on your trees for any signs of holes, or discoloration. You’ll want to catch something early in order to get rid of it!

Don’t sit out this season!

iStock_000009939336_LargeRemember as long as the ground isn’t frozen, then you can go ahead and plant your items. Don’t worry about waiting until the fall or until next spring. Once you get your trees and shrubs planted this summer you can go ahead and start enjoying them. As long as they get enough water, they will flourish!

Helpful Summer Lawn and Garden Tips

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13615047_1371441292870497_6253295095098226131_nHere’s some helpful Summer lawn and garden tips:

Chores and Maintenance
– If rain is lacking, practice water-wise horticultural techniques

– Determine which plants are most important, and water them first

– Water plants early in the day through drip irrigation or hand-held hose with shut-off nozzle

– Re-apply mulch to plantings to help conserve moisture

– Allow lawns to go dormant; they will green up again when rain returns

– Continue to remove weeds that compete for water

– Continue to stake floppy plants and vines

– Mow lawns regularly to keep grass height at 2 to 2 1/2″

– Continue to aerate and moisten compost pile to speed decomposition

– Continue to apply acid mulch to azaleas and rhododendrons, and other ericaceous ornamentals

– Apply a summer mulch to rose beds to preserve moisture and control weeds

– Deadhead annuals and perennials to encourage continuous bloom, and cut back any rampant growth

– Continue to spray roses weekly with a baking soda fungicide (See June for the recipe)

– Remove any fallen leaves and debris that can harbor insect pests and disease organisms

– Pinch back asters and chrysanthemums one last time

– Finish deadheading rhododendrons and lilacs

– Continue to apply deer repellent